How to Find (and Keep!) Truck Drivers

find-truck-drivers

Finding a truck driver isn’t an easy task.  Advertising in newspapers and magazines is expensive and searching most job sites is a nightmare because, despite your search criteria, you have to sift through a deluge of applicants looking for jobs other than driving a truck.  There’s a better solution. Trucker Search is a web-based service that matches companies with truck drivers who are looking for work and no one else. It couldn’t be simpler. Post your available positions for truckers to search themselves or search our database of available truck drivers.  This streamlined service is only for truck drivers and only for companies looking for drivers.

With information such as years of experience, number of tickets, preferred runs, and types of vehicles they can drive, you can find the perfect fit for your company.  You can even view the full resume before you call.

Today’s is a seller’s market in the world of trucking driven by a shortage of drivers so it’s not just a matter of finding a great truck driver, you want to keep them too.  Fortunately, there’s a lot you can do to create an environment where your new hire will want to become a seasoned employee.

  1. Pay more.  This may seem obvious, your pay needs to be competitive, and as the old saying goes, you get what you pay for.  If you someone who’s good, you’re going to have to pay a decent wage. Additionally, many truckers prefer predictable pay and may want to stay with your company if you’re offering a guaranteed minimum number of miles each week.
  2. Be engaged.  Let your drivers know who they’re working for.  It’s easy for a truck driver to become detached when they’re out on the road alone so you should meet with them regularly and make them feel like they’re part of the company because they are, and a very important one at that.
  3. Offer incentives to do well.  Paying bonuses to the trucker who gets the best fuel mileage or other offers can save the company money.  It will not only encourage your drivers to work harder, a little healthy competition can make them feel like they’re part of something bigger.
  4. Ask for driver input.  Truck drivers will have useful ideas on improving the trucking aspect of your business, and they’ll be a more satisfied employee with the knowledge that their ideas are being heard.
  5. Keep your drivers healthy.  Driving a truck has the tendency to be an unhealthy profession.  Inactivity during hours on the road mixed with the convenience of fast food can wreak havoc on the health of drivers.  Encourage them to make healthy choices with diet and exercise contests, try to start a basketball or softball team, or put a walking path around your facility.  Even putting up a basketball hoop or volleyball court will give them a place to exercise and it will show them that you care about their health.
  6. Keep routes regional.  One reason for the shortage of drivers in the shipping industry may be that many are turned off the the profession because of long trips that will keep them away from home for long stretches of time.  If it’s possible to break up your routes, your drivers may be happier and stay with your company.
  7. Be honest and upfront about the job.  Most turnovers in the trucking industry happen in the first 2 or 3 months, largely because of driver dissatisfaction and that the job didn’t match their expectations.  Don’t tell them it’s a job that will have them home every weekend if it won’t. Being honest will help you find the right driver for the job.

With the right tools, such as Trucker Search, and some key strategies, it is possible to find and retain the right people for your company.  To begin your search for a great candidate, go to truckersearch.com or call (888)254-3712 and we’ll tell you how to get started.

 

Trucker Jobs Galore: Why the Old Way of Finding Trucking Jobs is Terrible and Why It’s Time to Embrace the New

trucker-jobs

Nobody likes looking for a job.  After hours of compiling or updating your résumé, you turn to the internet.  You Google “trucker jobs”. Google returns an infinite sea of job sites.  Okay, you take a deep breath and pick one of the more popular jobs search sites.  You input your criteria and after a few seconds, you get a list of jobs. As you peruse them, you realize that many of them require licenses you don’t have or you’re overqualified for many of them or that many of them aren’t even for truck driving jobs.  Frustrated, you pick up the help wanted section of your newspaper. Nothing. You make a list of major trucking companies that you know and begin viewing each of the websites, finding their careers section, and uploading your résumé to each one.  Within a half hour, you get up and walk away from your computer, resisting the urge to throw it out the window, as you go outside to contemplate your life choices.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

Trucking Companies are Desperate

Today, trucking companies are in a scramble to find truckers to fill openings.  According to a 2017 truck driver shortage analysis by the ATA, in 2016, there was a shortage of 36,500 truck drivers, and if that rate continues, that number is expected to swell to 174,000 by 2026.  

It’s not just Amazon that is driving the demand for drivers.  Online shopping has always been a boon for small retail companies by allowing them to compete on a level playing field without the expense of brick and mortar stores, but now big retailers like Target and Walmart are finding success with huge increases in their online sales.  This shortage is causing shipping costs to skyrocket, and consumers are beginning to incur those costs in the form of higher prices for goods. While this is bad news for consumers, it is good news for truckers. Many companies are desperate for driver and will offer higher pay and better benefits to their drivers.

Life on the road isn’t always an easy one and long hauls can be physically and mentally demanding and keep you away from your family for long periods of time.  This is one of the biggest reasons that potential truckers are turned off. Fortunately, the shortage is making trucking companies rethink the way they do things, and many are now offering shorter runs so their truckers can be home with their families more.  Retailers are opening more warehouse “hubs” so hauls are broken up into shorter legs.

The high demand has also caused salaries for drivers to skyrocket too.  The U. S. Labor Department says the median salary for truck drivers is around $44,000, but many companies today are hiring at $80,000+ to fill trucking positions.  When salaries in most industries have remained stagnant over the last several years, trucker salaries have been going up 8% to 12% yearly.  Along with sign-on bonuses, 401Ks, and other benefits, the time is ripe to make a great living as a truck driver.  If you’re not a licensed driver yet, some companies are even offering to pay for potential employees to take the course that is required for a CDL license which can cost as much as $8,000.

A Better Way to Search

There are many ways to look for a trucking job.  You can search print ads, bulletin boards at truck stops, help wanted ads in trade publications, social media, and driver application events.  You can search online job sites but they don’t do a very effective job filtering out jobs you wouldn’t be interested in and you may find yourself sifting through a lot of jobs that don’t meet your qualifications.  All of these ways take up a lot of time and lead to a lot of dead ends. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a way that you could post your résumé and have interested companies contact you? Or what if you could search a database of only trucking jobs available in a region you choose?  

There is!

TruckerSearch.com allows you to search for trucking jobs and have trucking companies search for you.  Only trucking jobs and only what you’re looking for. Fill out an application with your relevant information, and TruckerSearch will match you with companies looking for you.  It couldn’t be faster or simpler.

If you’re tired of spinning your wheels and want to get back out on the road, go to TruckerSearch.com and find your dream driving job!

Truckers: What Should Be on Your Resume?

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With the current shortage of drivers in the trucking industry, you may be thinking that you can merely snap your fingers and you’ve got yourself a gig.  Perhaps. But is the job you really want? Does it have the hours you want? Does it have the pay you want?

The truth is, it may not be that difficult to land a job as a trucker right now but these are typically the lower-paying jobs that few really want.  The jobs that have high pay and good benefits are still highly competitive and if you want one of those jobs, it’ll take some work that includes a good resume.

A hiring manager could post a job and receive 2 applicants or 200.  You don’t know. Assume there are 200, and ask yourself this question:  

Will my resume rise to the top of the pile?   

Style

They say that you can’t judge a book by its cover and while this is true, it’s often the cover that catches our eye and prompts us to pick up the book and read the back to see what it’s about.  This is what the style of your resume is for. A plain black and white list of your accomplishments, no matter how outstanding you may think they are, will be lost in a sea of other plain, black and white lists of accomplishments.  

Use color but very little and don’t use anything too bright.  Dark blue, hunter green, or grey can add a professional look but should be used sparingly, such as a line separating your identifying information from the rest of the resume or an outside border.  It’s important not to distract from the information on the resume. Color should only be used on paper resumes, however. When applying on online sites such as TruckerSearch, resumes should be black and white only.  A color that you choose on your computer may not look the same at the other end for the hiring manager so it’s best to not risk it looking bad.

Use legible fonts.  Again, if you’re using unusual fonts, the hiring manager may not receive them the same way so you should stick with popular fonts such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Verdana.  Keep the size at 12 points but you can make headings 14 so they stand out a little or make them bold, italicized, or capitals.

Make sure there is some white space.  If everything is crammed together, it will be difficult to read.  At the same time, double-spacing will make it seem empty and resumes should be kept to one page, if possible.  

Opening

After your contact information, include a brief 2 or 3 sentence summary of who you are and what you can do for the business at which you’re applying.  These sentences shouldn’t be too detailed, simply a couple of your main selling points.

Example:  

Truck driver with over 15 years of experience making on-time deliveries operating reefers.  Proficient in light truck repairs and maintenance and possesses CDL as well as HAZMAT certification.  

Of course, all of these things should be highlighted within the body of the resume as well but the short opening paragraph should entice the hiring manager to read further.  

Body

Here’s where you put the meat of your experience and qualifications.  List your experience in reverse-chronological order as your latest experience is usually the most relevant.  Read the description of the job you’re applying for and make sure that any of those experiences or qualifications that you possess are emphasized in the resume.  You want them to know that you’re the applicant they’ve been looking for.

Be specific as much as possible; don’t speak in generalities.  A hiring manager wants to know what you can specifically do, not what you can generally do.  Highlight your strengths.  Ask yourself how you will benefit the company.  It’s not just about your experience and qualifications (although be sure to include all of those!), it’s also about what they can expect from you.  On time. Safe driving record. Ability to lift cargo. Good customer service skills. Math skills. Have you trained anyone? What types of vehicles can you drive?  They need to know you’re everything they’re looking for and more.

After your experience and qualifications, include an “activities” or “interest” section.  You may wonder why this would have anything to do with a job driving a truck but it does. If you do any kind of sports or weightlifting or running, it will show them that you’re fit.  Long hours spent in a truck can cause health issues and they want someone who isn’t going to be out sick all of the time. If you’ve done a martial art in the past, include that. It shows that you are disciplined.  Include any volunteer work you do. It shows you care about your community. Be selective, however. The activities section should be brief.

Action Words

Some of the action words that you should include on your resume if they apply are:

Reliable Repair Unload Freight
Dependable On-time Clean Driving Record
Clean Pick up HAZMAT-certified
Conduct Lift Security
Deliver Operate Checklist
Load Perform Delivery Schedules
Maintain CDLA Operator
Transport Record-keeping Customer Service
Verify Safety Vehicle Maintenance


Your resume should be an overview of who you are and what you bring to the table.  It should be thorough yet to the point.

At TruckerSearch, we know there are many great truck drivers out there looking for great jobs.  We make it easy to post a resume for top companies to see. Or search our database for jobs and email them your resume directly.  It couldn’t be easier. So polish up that resume and go to TruckerSearch today!

Why Becoming a Truck Driver May Be Just the Thing for You

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Maybe college wasn’t for you.  Perhaps the thought of going into serious debt for the foreseeable future turned you off to it or maybe it was four more years of school that didn’t appeal to you.  What you’re left with are low-paying, dead-end jobs that don’t pay enough to support yourself, let alone even think about supporting a family.

There is another option.  Becoming a truck driver. You, behind the wheel, wind in your hair, no boss standing over you asking you if the fries are done.  

But driving a truck doesn’t pay much, does it?

According to the Wall Street Journal, some private fleet drivers earned as much as $86,000 in 2017, up from $73,000 in 2013.  Currently, there is a shortage of drivers and many Baby Boomers set to retire on the horizon which is driving up the salaries of CDL-trained drivers.  As further incentive, some companies are offering significant bonuses―some in the tens of thousands range―for signing up with them, as well as excellent benefits packages.

I need a special license, don’t I?

Yes.  Typically, you need a CDL (Commercial Driver’s License) which can be obtained in a couple of months or less and it usually costs between $3,000 and $7,000 depending on the school.  Federal aid may help pay for the class if it meets their requirements. The good news is that some trucking companies are offering to pay the cost of your CDL training if you agree to work for them when you graduate.

Isn’t it an unhealthy lifestyle?

It doesn’t have to be.  Driving is a sedentary job, as is sitting behind a desk staring at a computer monitor all day.  Trucking companies realize this and are encouraging their employees to exercise more by installing walking paths at their place of business or starting basketball or softball leagues.  Many offer wellness programs as part of their benefits packages that include discounted gym memberships.

Truck stops are beginning to catch on as well by offering healthier food choices so you’re not stuck with unhealthy fast food.  To take things a step further, Carnegie Mellon University has been designing trucks to have all of the comforts of home including small kitchenettes so truckers can cook healthier meals for themselves while they’re out on the road.

Won’t I be away from home for weeks on end?

Trucking companies are becoming more sensitive to the fact that drivers want more time at home so they can have a normal social life or start a family.  Many are offering short hauls that run regionally. Add to that the changes in how consumers buy things and how quickly they expect to get their purchases, many retailers are building more distribution centers to get their products to their customers more efficiently, which means shorter runs for truckers.

It’s lonely on the road, isn’t it?

Long hauls can be lonely.  But many trucking companies are open to truckers bringing a pet with them on the road.  “Bring Your Dog to Work Day” can be every day! For long trips, technology has eased loneliness by allowing them to Skype with their family back home and bring along comforts like Netflix to pass the time.  Truckers are friendly people and participating in trucker forums and other social media may allow you to meet some friends on the road.

Don’t I have to be 21?

Not necessarily.  Currently, if you are under 21, you can get your CDL but you cannot drive across state lines.  You may be able to find a company that can oblige until you’re 21.

On March 21st, a bill was introduced in the House of Representatives that would abolish the under 21 rule.  The bill requires that drivers between the ages of 18 and 21 log 400 hours of on-duty time and 240 hours of driving time with an experienced driver in the cab.  Many feel this bill is just a common sense way to solve the driver shortage. Passage of the bill would be likely to relieve the shortage and also provide a solution for people who are looking to begin a good-paying career right after high school.  

Won’t trucks be automated in the future?

The keyword there is future.  There are many safety and legal concerns with driverless trucks, and even if these can be overcome, it doesn’t mean that they’ll be completely autonomous.  Truckers may need to adapt to a different definition of what it means to drive a truck but this isn’t expected for many years down the road.

No one claims that being a truck driver is an easy job but with all of the added pay and benefits currently being offered, it can be a lucrative one.  And with TruckerSearch.com, you can post your resume for potential employers or actively search our vast database of available jobs. We make it quick and easy to find a good, high-paying job.  Kick off your career in the trucking industry by going to TruckerSearch.com or call (888)254-3712 and answer the call of the open road!

CDL Class A Jobs

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Despite the growing economy, companies continue to look for ways to trim back and cut costs where they can, including reductions in their staff.  However, while other industries are tightening their workforce belt, the trucking industry is booming.

With the rise of Amazon, consumer expectations changed.  Consumers became spoiled by the ability to be able to point and click and have an item on their doorstep within two days. In order to keep up, businesses large and small needed to ship products quickly and efficiently or risk losing customers.  All of which means there are more trucks on the road than ever before.

The challenge of these new trends in shipping lies in putting drivers in those trucks.  Many people who take the course to earn their CDL will have job offers before they’ve completed it.  Sure, the potential wages that come with the job make it appealing, but the hours turn some people away.  Many people want families and the hours that go along with trucking jobs are not always conducive to a middle-class family lifestyle.  People want to be involved in their kids’ lives and that’s easier with a Monday through Friday, 9-5 job. Fortunately, the trucking industry is listening. Some are offering schedules that are more flexible and with fewer nights and weekends on the road.  Others are creating more hubs there’s no need for long hauls.

Another issue in the trucking industry is the fact that so many truckers are approaching retirement age, many more than are signing up for jobs on the open road.  According to the Department of Labor Statistics, the average age of a commercial truck driver is 55 with many of them on the verge of retiring.  Trucking companies are taking steps to attract younger drivers by offering to pay for classes so people can earn their CDL and begin working for them.  Many are making a concerted effort to fill those driving seats by targeting women, minorities, and veterans and are increasing starting pay.

The problem of the lack of commercial truck drivers is one that has far-reaching effects.  Fewer shipments mean fewer products in the stores which means demand will be higher. The result?  Higher prices for everyone. Truck drivers are quite simply a very crucial part of the U.S. economy.  

To keep shipments moving, the shipping process needs to be streamlined.  Drivers and employers need an easier way to find one another. That’s where Trucker Search comes in.  Trucker Search is a simple way for drivers and owner-operators to find companies with employment opportunities and it helps employers and recruiters find available  drivers. Through a simple interface, truck drivers can post their resume and wait for offers or actively search through the database of employers in need of them. Conversely, employers can search through resumes of truckers looking for work.  They can modify their search to narrow the results to the perfect candidate. Trucker Search is an effective avenue for employers and recruiters to advertise available positions to a large pool of interested and qualified applicants.

At Trucker Search, connecting truck drivers and employers is what we do.  It’s quick, it’s easy, and it gets truckers back on the road. Get started today at TruckerSearch.com or call us at (888)254-3712.

What Makes a Great Truck Driver?

what-makes-a-great-truck-driver

Trucking is one of the most in-demand jobs there is, and as long as goods need to get from Point A to Point B, the need for great, dependable drivers will be there.  Truck drivers are so much more than just someone who drives a truck. They’re responsible for customer paperwork, dealing with mechanical issues as they arise, loading and unloading freight, keeping driving logs, and even possibly transporting hazardous materials.  They are a vital link in the chain that brings a product from design to the shelves, and as a company, you don’t want to find a good truck driver, you want to find a great one.

What makes a great truck driver?

1. Reliability

The world runs on deadlines and a great driver will consistently be there to meet them.  If one person in the chain doesn’t show or does their job poorly, everything gets delayed and that one unreliable worker could end up costing you in the long run.  

2.  An Excellent Driving Record

A good driving record is an indicator of professionalism and safety.  

3.  Alertness

A great driver is always alert.  Weather, traffic, and hazardous driving conditions can cause dangers in a matter of seconds, and it’s important to always be aware and to take breaks when fatigue sets in.

4.  Physical fitness

In a profession where a major portion of the work is done sitting down, it’s essential to take the extra steps needed to stay in shape.  A fit driver is more alert and has the stamina needed for long drives, as well as the strength needed for loading and unloading cargo.

5.  Sense of Responsibility

Truck drivers are not only responsible for their truck and their cargo getting safely to their destination, but they are also responsible for the safety of other drivers who share the road along the way.     

6.  Independence

Anything can happen on the road.  A great driver will be able to handle any emergency situation with their truck and their cargo without supervision.

7.  Mechanical Skills.

Although mechanical skills are not a requirement for being able to drive a truck, a basic knowledge of minor repairs such as changing a fuse or a tire can be helpful and make your cargo able to meet its deadline.

8.  Stress Management

Driving a truck, meeting deadlines, and dealing with traffic can be stressful for anyone.  Being able to manage day-to-day stresses while remaining calm and cool is a great asset in a driver.

9.  Good Communication Skills

Throughout the day, a truck driver is in contact with the company, the clients, warehouse workers, and many others.  Good communication skills with a positive attitude go a long way to make any situation better and represent your company with professionalism.

10.  Honesty

Cutting corners can be downright dangerous in the trucking industry.  Great drivers follow all safety rules and regulations and can be trusted with whatever cargo they carry.
At Trucker Search, we know what makes a great driver because we’ve helped so many of them find great companies to work for.  Quite simply, we’re a matchmaker for truckers and companies who need to transport freight. As an employer or recruiter, you can search for drivers who are in a specific location, have certain trailer experience, years of driving experience, etc., and find the right match for your company.  As a driver, you can find a company to work for long-term or short, part-time or full, at a local or nationwide company. With Trucker Search, everybody wins. Go to www.truckersearch.com today and begin your search for a great trucker or a great job today!