Steps to Protect Your Freight During Stops

steps-to-protect-your-freight-during-stops

Stopping to rest and refresh is extremely important for the health and well-being of drivers, but unfortunately, freight theft is a problem that threatens the cargo of truck drivers all over the nation. Thieves are getting sneakier and smarter, but so are drivers, companies, and technology. Freight theft is expensive and time consuming to deal with, but it can be prevented by taking simple steps to ensure your cargo is secure and protected during stops.

How Does Freight Theft Happen?

Freight theft can happen in several ways, but most if not all of these, occur while the truck is not in motion. Freight theft can be planned or spontaneous and is possible anytime your truck is stopped, particularly when it is left unattended for any period of time.

Some thieves may attempt to follow your truck from the pick-up point to where you first stop, especially if you are carrying high-demand cargo. Freight theft may also happen when you leave your truck, even for just a few minutes, without supervision because thieves sometimes wait nearby high traffic areas for trucks to steal from.

Where Does Freight Theft Happen?

Freight theft happens most often at truck stops but can occur anytime a driver is is not moving. However, there are some locations that have notably high records of freight theft, there are maps available for these locations, but they are typically depicted as being near Southern California and Nevada, the Great Lake States, Eastern Texas, Southeastern States, and Northeastern Pennsylvania.

These spots have the most cases of cargo theft, but it can happen anywhere that your truck is left unattended. Many companies suggest that drivers don’t stop for the first 200 miles of the journey to discourage anyone who decided to follow the trucks, especially in high-theft locations.

How to Keep Your Cargo Safe

Cargo thieves are getting more sophisticated, so it is more important than ever to keep your delivery locations to yourself and refrain from posting them or telling people about the route you are going to take. This simple measure can prevent thieves from targeting your truck.

Taking breaks is important, but it can provide thieves with an opportunity. However, there are many ways that you can reduce the danger associated with resting. One of the most important ways is knowing your route beforehand and avoiding high-risk locations. Another way to avoid freight theft is by using simple prevention methods of locks, seals, and alarms.

Staying with your truck while taking a break is one of the best ways to prevent cargo theft from happening, but if you are unable to stay with it, try to park in a place that is well-lit, another tip is to back the truck near obstacles that will make it hard to open the truck doors.

Defensive Trucking

If something goes wrong and you think there may be suspicious dealings involved in your transport, or if your freight gets stolen, it is important to report it to the authorities and contact the National Cargo Theft Task Force (NCTTF) which is a coalition of people from all different occupations with the sole goal of preventing cargo theft.

Another way to protect your cargo even if it is stolen is to use technology. There are many devices made to protect cargo, some of the most effective are GPS trackers which may assist you in retrieving some of your stolen freight, and maybe even catching the thieves!

Final Thoughts

Cargo theft is a costly crime that is becoming increasingly more sophisticated as time and technology progress, but it is a preventable crime in some cases, and drivers are the most important people in this prevention cycle. Make sure to lock your truck, set an alarm, and stay with your freight as much as possible to better prevent theft on your next shipping route, and call the NCTTF if anything seems amiss. Together, we can stop Freight Theft.

 

Drug & Alcohol Testing: What You Need to Know

drug-alcohol-testing

In the modern world, drug and alcohol tests are becoming more prevalent in businesses. While these tests may prove to be inconvenient, they are a crucial factor in keeping both truckers and commuters safe while driving.

Why Does Testing Happen?

Unfortunately, there is currently a drug and alcohol abuse problem in the United States – this means that many people are either using alcohol irresponsibly or taking illegal drugs. Both actions can result in serious impairment when on the job and may cause terrible consequences such as vehicle damage, personal injury, or even death in some serious cases.

Drug testing is used to prevent tragedies such as these from happening by ensuring that truckers and other people with Commercial Drivers Licenses (CDL) are being safe on the roads. Drug testing can prevent serial users from causing danger to other truckers and civilians, it can also prevent drunk drivers from posing a threat.

When Does Testing Happen?

The first round of drug testing that a trucker will go through is during the process of earning their Commercial Driver’s License. This initial test is to verify there is no drug or alcohol abuse problem at the start. It is an important step in receiving your CDL.

The next predictable form of drug testing occurs during truck-related accidents which include those with a human fatality, those with bodily injury and a citation, and those with damage to any motor vehicle that has to be towed away with a citation.

Drug testing may also occur in four more circumstances as defined by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. This extension of the Department of Transportation specifies that employers must commit regular random testing of at least 2 employees. It also permits testing where reasonable suspicion is involved, meaning the employer believes that an employee has been using intoxicating substances.

The final two occurrences of drug testing are when drivers have refused to allow a drug test, tested positive, or violated the testing policy in any other way. These are deemed return-to-duty testing which allows a previous violator to return to work once they agree to test and test negative. Follow-up testing which may occur bi-monthly for a year or even up to four years with reasonable suspicion. For each of these types of tests, the driver must continue to test negative to remain employed.

How Does Testing Work?

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, employers are required to perform the various instances of drug testing mentioned above. They are to perform random drug tests on 2 or more employees from a random selection at a time, and they are to take responsibility for pre-screening (testing before employment), return-to-duty, and follow-up testing as well.

Drug testing is a fairly simple process that can be completed quickly and easily and will help keep all people in America safe from substance-related accidents. The most common drug test involves urinating in a test cup and the administrator pouring the liquid into a test tube to be sent to a lab for testing. Standard drug tests check for, marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, and phencyclidine.

Alcohol testing is very simple as well and is typically conducted using a device called a breathalyzer. This machine requires you to blow into it for a short period of time, and it will determine whether you have been drinking alcohol recently. It measures any amount of alcohol concentration of 0.02 and higher.

Final Thoughts

Drug and alcohol testing are a necessary component of being employed in the United States of America, it is meant to keep everyone safe from the harm that abuse of these substances can produce. Drug and alcohol testing are part of a simple process that typically takes less than 20 minutes to complete!

Best Trucking Routes for an Autumn View

best-routes-for-fall

As a semi-truck driver, you have long days with drives from stop to stop. We are here to help you take advantage of the fall scenery along the routes in the United States. From the East Coast, to the South, to the Midwest, to the West Coast there is so many miles of beautiful scenery and animal life you can spot from the seat of your truck.

I-25 Through Colorado

If you ever get the chance to deliver a load to a city in Colorado and get to drive I-25, you will not be disappointed! It passes through all the major cities in Colorado east of the Rocky Mountains, including Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Fort Collins, and Greeley. If you enter Colorado from New Mexico, you will travel up I-25 and pass through the town of Wootton. I-25 then turns back up north and bypasses near the east side of the Trinidad Lake State Park, which is where you will find the Trinidad Lake, a dammed reservoir. Trinidad is the first major city that lies along I-25. The following 30 miles will take you through rural areas of Colorado until you reach Walsenburg. I-25 continues on until it bypasses the Orlando Reservoir and reaches Colorado City. From Colorado City, I-25 will take you to the St. Charles Reservoir which is right before you reach the city of Pueblo. The stretch between Denver and Colorado Springs crosses the Palmer Divide, which separates the Arkansas River basin from the South Platte basin. This drive provides you with some of I-25’s most scenic views of the Rocky Mountains and its foothills.

I-80 Through Utah

When you have the opportunity to deliver a load to Salt Lake City, Utah, you will be able to take in the beauty of the Great Salt Lake. The part of I-80 that goes through Utah is 196.34 miles long. While traveling along I-80, you will be able to see views of not only the Great Salt Lake but also Antelope Island, which is home to pronghorn, bighorn sheep, American bison, porcupine, badger, coyote, bobcat, mule deer, and millions of waterfowl. As you continue traveling down I-80, it becomes concurrent with I-15 passing along the western and southern edges of downtown Salt Lake City. After separating from I-15, I-80 continues east through South Salt Lake and continues through Parley’s Canyon, entering the Wasatch National Forest. I-80 travels through Parley’s Canyon up the western slope of the Wasatch Front, cresting the mountains at an elevation of 7,016 feet at Parley’s Summit, which is the highest point on I-80 in Utah.

I-64

When your travels take you on I-64, you will not be disappointed by the views you will see, no matter what state you go through. When driving through Missouri, you will have the opportunity to see the St. Louis Arch and view the Mississippi River. In Illinois, you will pass over Skillet Fork, which is a 98-mile river in the southern part of the state. Kentucky offers you the chance to drive through the northern part of the Daniel Boone National Forest, and in West Virginia, you will be able to see the beautiful views of the New River Gorge.

If you have been wanting to see the countryside and thought about becoming a truck driver,  Trucker Search can help you find the perfect company to work for. There are various routes across the country that can make your drive fun and exciting. Contact us today at 1-888-254-3712 and our team will help you find the perfect match.

Hobbies That Truck Drivers Can Do On the Road

hobbies-that-truck-drivers-can-do-on-the-road


Driving a truck can be fun, exciting, and a great career.  It can also be a bit dull.  Those long roads that bring such beautiful scenery over every crest, can also bring unrelenting boredom with each stretch.  And it’s not just the hours spent driving.  If you’re living in your truck for days or weeks at a time, not having something to help occupy your mind and hands can make the hours seem like years.  Having a hobby or interest also
relieves stress and anxiety and helps you take a break from the real world.

Photography

Photography is the perfect hobby for someone who spends most of their time out on the road seeing so much of the country.  Good quality digital cameras aren’t as expensive as they used to be and recent cell phone models have excellent cameras built in.  With a laptop and inexpensive software, you can edit and share your art with your family at home.  

Learning an Instrument

If you love music and you’ve always wanted to learn an instrument, the cab of your truck is the perfect place (not while you’re driving, of course).  Guitar, keyboard, trumpet, saxophone, and many more can be learned in the comfort of your cab during your free time.  Buy a book or take lessons online, who knows, maybe you’ll find some other musicians to jam with on the road.

Writing

Whether writing in a journal or creating a fictional story, writing is a great way to express yourself thoughtfully.  Some people find writing to be a therapeutic way of working through feelings, or maybe you simply have dreams of being published one day.  Maybe now is the time to write that Great American Novel or a blog about your life on the road.  

Learn a Language

There’s an abundance of apps, audio books, or videos that can teach you a new language.  The great thing about learning a language with an audiobook is that you can do it on the clock while you’re driving.  Are you ready to learn a new language?  Oui!

Podcasts

Listening to podcasts while you’re driving can help pass the time and you can learn something new.  Whatever your interests, someone makes a podcast about it!  The same is true for audio books.  You can learn something new or lose yourself in some good fiction.

Exercise

Getting exercise on the road is essential to staying in shape when you’re sitting for hours on end.  During breaks, go for a run or a brisk walk.  Bring some small weights to keep in your cab.   Making exercise your new hobby has endless benefits!

Drawing

Life on the road gives the budding artist an abundance of subjects to sketch.  If you’re not naturally artistic, YouTube has lots of videos to show you how to draw.

No matter what you choose, starting a new hobby will help you push out the boredom of life on the road.  

If you’re a driver looking for a great place to work, look no further than Trucker Search.   On Trucker Search’s website, you can post your résumé as well as search the comprehensive database of companies looking for drivers.  It’s a great resource for any driver looking for a great place to work.

Source:  https://www.verywellmind.com/the-importance-of-hobbies-for-stress-relief-3144574

Healthy Meals You Can Have in Your Truck

healthy-meals-you-can-have-in-your-truck


Obesity has long been associated with driving a truck.  It’s a mainly sedentary job and despite the lack of physical activity, it can be exhausting. After a long stretch behind the wheel, drivers want to relax and rest up for the next shift.  Fitting in adequate exercise can be difficult so maintaining a healthy weight can be challenging.  

It doesn’t have to be that way.  With effort and planning, it is possible to make healthy meals while you’re out on the road.  One of the keys to healthy eating on the road is to keep your truck well-stocked with healthy choices.  If you don’t have them on hand, it’ll be harder to resist picking up truck stop food.     

Start by using the right equipment.  Space in a truck is always limited so think about the foods you’d like to make in your truck.  There are numerous cooking options such as a hot pot, microwave, toaster, small slow cooker, portable stove, and two-burner stovetop.  A fridge is a necessity and one with a freezer is best.    

When you make your own meals, you are in total control.  How many calories, how much salt, and  fat are entirely up to you.  Processed foods tend to be higher in all of these things, especially sodium, and if you are overweight and have heart issues or high blood pressure, it’s important to watch your salt intake.  

Breakfast

Protein helps you feel fuller for longer. Having a protein-packed breakfast will help keep you from reaching for snacks.  Some delicious ideas to start the day are:

  • Whole wheat toast with peanut butter (lots of protein)
  • Instant oatmeal
  • Cottage cheese with fresh fruit
  • Whole-grain cereal 
  • Low-fat yogurt with fresh fruit
  • Omelets (throw in your favorite protein, cheeses, and veggies)

Lunch

  • Wraps are great for lunch because you can eat with one hand and fill them with anything you like.  Use lean meats like sliced turkey, or tuna, and add tons of fresh veggies.  Use a low-carb or whole wheat wrap to make it even healthier.
  • Soups (pick the non-creamy, low-sodium varieties)
  • Veggie pasta salad

Snacks

If you have a freezer (you should), stock it with healthy treats like frozen yogurt or fruit bars.  Other handy snacks: 

  • Hard-boiled eggs
  • Cheese and whole-grain crackers
  • Dried fruit (great snack that doesn’t need to be refrigerated)
  • Unsalted mixed nuts

Dinner

Meal prep is your friend.  Many websites show you how to make a week’s worth of meals in one day.  Make them the day before your trip and pack them in reusable plastic containers.  Meal prep often involves cooking a protein, like chicken, and then adding rice or noodles, various veggies and sauces and spices, varying them so each meal is different.  It’s an inexpensive way to give yourself some variety in your healthy dinners. 

Rotisserie chicken can be thrown in with some pre-cooked rice and veggies and a little soy sauce, made into a delicious chicken salad wrap, or tossed on a salad. 

Tuna casserole can be cooked on a stovetop or in a slow cooker.  Egg noodles, tuna, cream of mushroom soup, cheese, and frozen peas, and you’ve got a hardy meal.

Mac-n-cheese can be made in a crockpot with cheese, macaroni, milk, butter, and eggs.  It’s not the healthiest, but you’ve got to indulge every now and then.  

When you do eat out on the road, try for healthier options like food that is grilled instead of fried, skip the hamburger bun, and drink water instead of soda.

By planning and prepping your meals before you head out on the road, it’ll be easier to maintain a healthy weight, you’ll have more energy, and you’ll feel better about yourself.  

If you’re looking to start a career in the trucking industry, Trucker Search can help. Connecting truck drivers and employers is what we do.  It’s quick, easy, and it can get you that dream job on the open road. Get started today at TruckerSearch.com or call us at (888)254-3712.    

The Latest in Chrome for Your Truck

latest-in-chrome-for-your-truck

As a truck driver, you want to be proud of your rig. Seeing all of the amazing rigs at contests across the country can inspire any truck driver to spruce up their truck. One thing to keep in mind, however, is that when it comes to chrome, one size does not fit all. Many semi-truck accessories must be manufactured specifically for your make and model. Having an example using your same make and model of truck makes it easier for shops to communicate with semi-truck accessory manufacturers. There are manufacturers who produce universal accessories; however, they do not always fit or function as well as the specific brand.

When it comes to choosing the right chrome accessories for your truck, keep these things in mind:

  • Find pictures of trucks that you like. You may not always know the name of the part that you are interested in. By having a picture, you are able to bring it into a shop and have the experts help you. If you don’t have time to stop in, you can also try emailing a picture.
  • Look for warranties. Your truck is your livelihood so you must remember that with any aftermarket change, you are running the risk of changing things from the manufacturer’s original design. Make sure that whatever parts you choose, they have a good warranty program. Having a good warranty will help keep you from experiencing any considerable downtime if a major breakdown occurs.
  • Try adding value. Adding chrome and other custom parts can instantly add value to older or barebone models. When trying to figure out what accessories to add to your rig, try learning what the top tier model of your truck came with off the line. You can easily redesign your basic model truck to make it as good or even better than the elite model.

Keeping up with the latest looks and style for your big rig shouldn’t be stressful. It should be a fun and exciting time making sure your truck looks the best that it can. Here are some ideas as to what kind of chrome accessories will make your truck stand out.

  • Chrome bumpers
    –     Practical, affordable, and stylish
  • Chrome nut covers
  • ABS Chrome tape
    –     Impact-resistant, mechanically and thermally resilient, and high-quality thermoplastic which is ecologically sound
  • Chrome trim
    –     Provides a custom look and is perfect for trimming your bug shields, door jams, and windshields
  • Chrome wire loom and ties
    –     These are the perfect way to beautify and protect your wire, cable, or hose applications
  • Chrome train whistle
    –     A fun alternative to a train horn and sounds just like a real freight train
  • Chrome round horn covers
    –     These covers keep your horn blowing through all weather conditions
  • Chrome grill guards
    –     Grill guards can save you time and money in case of an accident or collision. They can decrease the number of times you have to visit the shop for repairs. Guards also add a clean, aggressive look to your truck and protect your bumper, lights, and hood.

Here at Trucker Search, we will help you find the right company that fits your needs and the most dedicated drivers that will make your company proud. There are many positions available so contact us today at 1-888-254-3712 so we can help you get started on your journey.

 

 

Turn Your Military Skills into a Successful Driving Career

turn-your-military-skills-into-a-successful-driving-career

If you have driven trucks in the military, trucking companies are eager to hear from you.  And there’s a good chance that the training and experience you earned there will allow you to get your CDL without attending driving school and fast track yourself into a new and rewarding career.  

Why Carriers Love to Hire Military Veterans

It’s more than just patriotism and wanting to support American veterans that make carriers eager to hire military veterans to work for them.  Many of the qualities and skills learned in the military are the same ones that make a good truck driver.  Trucking companies have learned that military veterans are:

  • Dependable
  • Alert and aware
  • Have strong self-discipline
  • Work as a team
  • Have strong mental focus
  • May be used to being away from home for extended periods which can make it easier to adapt better to life on the road.

Why A Job Driving a Truck Is a Great Opportunity for Veterans

A job in the trucking industry allows veterans to transition to a civilian job without starting back at square one.  Many of the skills and disciplines learned while working for Uncle Sam transfer easily into a career driving a commercial truck.  Employers will look at your previous driving in the military as experience and will pay you accordingly, even if you just got your CDL.  

Veterans may also be eligible to skip the skills test and just take the written exam to get their CDL.  To take advantage of this, you must be active duty (or honorably discharged less than a year ago) with at least 2 years’ experience operating a commercial motor vehicle as part of your job in the military.  Since 2014, all 50 states and D.C. allow the waiver.  More information on how to obtain the waiver can be found on FMCSA’s website.    

Without having to go to driving school, veterans can have a quick transition into a new, good-paying career.  However, if you are a veteran but you don’t qualify for the waiver, there are several ways to get help paying for driving school.  You can use your GI benefits to pay for it and the  Veterans Administration Apprenticeship Program and On-The-Job Training Programs offer help too.  There are also scholarships available and many truck driving schools offer military discounts and other aids for veterans.

Before the coronavirus pandemic, the trucking industry was experiencing a shortage of qualified and licensed drivers and as the economy begins to reopen and grow, the demand for experienced drivers will be back in high demand, ready for experienced military drivers to step in.      

If you’re a military veteran looking to start a new career in the trucking industry, Trucker Search is a great place to start. You can post your resume or search our vast database of companies looking for drivers to join their teams.  Visit Trucker Search and begin your new career today.

Sources:  

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license/application-military-skills-test-waiver

https://www.va.gov/education/about-gi-bill-benefits/how-to-use-benefits/on-the-job-training-apprenticeships/

 

Truck Drivers: How You Can Avoid Back Pain

truck-drivers-how-you-can-avoid-back-pain

Spending hours upon hours behind the wheel of a truck can be physically and mentally exhausting and dealing with back pain seems to be part of the territory.  Along with the long hours sitting there’s also the lifting that is often involved as well as the constant vibration of the truck. The movement may not seem that bad but when your entire body is vibrating for more than 8 hours every day, you’re bound to eventually have some injuries.  Sitting in the same position, sedentary for hours, causes poor circulation and your muscles and joints stiffen.  But you don’t have to accept it!  Back pain doesn’t have to be “part of the job”!  With some adjustments and changes, you can avoid back pain from driving a truck.

Look At Your Seat

Adjust your seat so you’re not only comfortable but that you also don’t have to strain to reach things.  Depending on your seat, it may be beneficial to get some added support in the seat area as well as good lumbar support for the lower back.  While driving, changing your position, even just a little, can prevent some of the pain that comes with sitting in the same position.     

Be Mindful of Your Posture 

Incorrect posture is terrible for the back.  Sit up straight, don’t slouch, and keep your chin parallel to the ground.  Letting your body relax in the seat all the time is only going to cause spinal problems.  If you keep your wallet in your back pocket, take it out when you drive.  It can cause you to sit with your hips higher on one side than the other.     

Stay at a Healthy Weight

Because driving a truck involves inactivity and unhealthy food options, truck drivers are often overweight.  In fact, a recent study appearing in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine found that 69% of truck drivers were obese.  Whether sitting or standing, carrying around excess  weight is extremely damaging to your musculoskeletal system that wasn’t built for it.  

Quit Smoking

The same study of obesity in drivers found that more than half (51%) smoked which is more than twice that of other occupations (19%).  People who smoke have higher rates of osteoporosis, lumbar disc diseases, and slower bone healing which can lead to chronic pain.  

Take Breaks

Because of strict schedules, it’s not always easy for drivers to get enough breaks throughout the day but it’s important to try to do so.  Get out and stretch your hamstrings.  Move around and get a little exercise if you can.    

Stretch

Find time to stretch while out on the road.  When you’re driving, stretch each leg, reach each arm out to the side and over your head, and move your head from side to side to stretch your neck.  When you stop for a break, bend over and touch those toes and reach up to the sky for a full-body stretch.  Do some more stretching in bed.  When you don’t use your muscles, they shorten.  Stretching actually elongates them, increasing your range of motion, and increases the blood supply and brings nutrients to your muscles.  

Get the Right Mattress

If you’re sleeping in your truck, it needs to have a good mattress, just like you have at home.  When it comes to a mattress for back pain relief, you have to be like Goldilocks―not too firm and not too soft.  You need back support but not rigidity that will prevent good sleep.  It’s also important to find the right sleep position that works for you.  Some tips on how to sleep to alleviate back pain can be found here.    

Get Help

Applying ice to your lower back for 15-20 minutes can calm nerves and provide short-term relief and a chiropractor may help as well.  Because of the prevalence of back pain in drivers, some truck stops have begun opening chiropractic offices with their other driver amenities.  

Driving a truck doesn’t have to destroy your back but it does take some mindfulness and extra steps to keep those back problems at bay.  

If you’re a driver looking for opportunities in the trucking industry, look no further than Trucker Search. At www.truckersearch.com, you can post your résumé (which is a short form application) as well as search the ever-expanding database of companies looking for drivers and job postings.  It’s a great resource for any driver starting in the trucking industry or looking for a new opportunity.

Sources:  

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ajim.22293

https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/smoking-and-chronic-back-pain

https://chiropractorofstlouis.com/blog-post/the-health-benefits-of-a-good-stretch

https://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sleep/best-sleeping-position-for-lower-back-pain#pillow-under-your-abdomen

https://www.webmd.com/back-pain/what-helps-with-lower-back-pain#2

 

9 Ways That Drivers Can Save Money On The Road

9-ways-that-drivers-can-save-money-on-the-road

It doesn’t matter if the economy is good or bad, it’s important to spend your money wisely, no matter what your profession.  Most people have jobs that take them no further from home than a short commute.  They don’t eat every meal away from home.  For truck drivers who spend time out on the road and away from home, saving money can be particularly challenging.  At home, it’s easy to shop around for deals on food and necessities, or just stay in and not spend any money.  Truck drivers are often stuck with whatever buying options are available along the highway which are usually much more expensive.  However, with a little planning, drivers can make wise choices that will save them money while on the road, and maybe a little time too.

 

  1. Make a budget and stick to it.  Nobody likes budgeting but it works.  Be sure to be realistic about your expenses and include a little wiggle room for entertainment.  If The Shining taught us anything, it’s that “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.”
  2. Avoid breakdowns.  By keeping up with regular maintenance on your truck, small problems may be discovered before they become big problems.  Maintenance is significantly cheaper than a breakdown.
  3. Limit your spending on food.  Gas stations and truck stops have a huge mark-up on food.  Instead, stock up on snacks and food from the grocery store.  This includes drinks as well―a 6-pack or larger of a particular drink at the grocery store is often approximately the cost of a single unit at a gas station.  Invest in a mini-fridge and stove for your truck.  They’ll quickly pay for themselves and you’ll be able to choose healthier options.  
  4. Follow the rules.  Traffic violations like speeding tickets can be expensive and add up and they’re completely avoidable.  
  5. Use free wifi whenever possible.  You may be able to ditch the high cost of your unlimited data plan or avoid overage charges.  Keep track of free wifi along your route so you know where it is next time.
  6. Pay your bills on time.  If you’re on the road for extended periods, be sure that your bills are paid before you go to avoid late payments, i.e. hefty late fees.  You could also download your bank’s app (they all have them) on your phone or tablet and do your banking on the road.  Late payments not only cost you money right away, but they cost you in the long run by affecting your credit score and resulting in higher interest rates the next time you apply for credit.
  7. Make healthy choices.  By regularly exercising, quitting smoking, and eating a healthy diet, you can  avoid some future medical problems.  Driving a truck, sitting behind the wheel all day and eating fast food makes staying in shape a challenge for drivers but with some dedication and determination, it can be done.
  8. Use cruise control whenever possible.  Manually adjusting your speed constantly uses more fuel than letting your truck do it.  Keeping it at 60MPH is most efficient and by keeping your speed under control you can avoid those expensive speeding tickets too.
  9. Pay your insurance all at once.  Most insurance companies offer a discount for paying upfront instead of monthly or quarterly.  For big rigs, this can mean significant savings.  

Another way to help your bottom line is to find the right company to work for that’s going to pay you what you’re worth.  Trucker Search can help. On Trucker Search’s website, you can post your résumé as well as search the comprehensive database of companies looking for drivers.  It’s a great resource for any driver looking for a great place to work.

Source:  https://ezfreightfactoring.com/blog/money-saving-tips-for-truckers

Driving a Truck In The Era of Social Distancing

driving-a-truck-in-the-era-of-social-distancing
If there’s a phrase that best describes our current situation, it’s “social distancing”.  It’s an easy enough concept to grasp:  by staying home and remaining at least 6 feet from others when we go out for necessities, the coronavirus won’t be able to make the jump from one person to the next, stopping the spread of the virus over time.

In practice, however, it’s not so easy.  Not everyone follows the rules and some people forget so navigating a grocery store and maintaining a 6-ft buffer is a bit like walking through a field of land mines with none of the explosions but all of the anxiety.

For essential workers, this is an all-day stress-fest.  Truck drivers are used to some solitude but during the pandemic have lost those usual welcomed times of human interactions along their routes.  Some truck stops have been forced to close their doors while others only offer drive-thru services which most trucks can’t maneuver through and won’t serve people who walk up to the drive-thru window.  Some drivers now have to pack their own foods and eat in their trucks.

Safety for drivers as well as anyone around them is most important during these difficult times.

Social Distancing Tips for Drivers

  • Stay 6 feet away from everyone even in truck stops, gas stations and points of delivery.
  • Use disposable gloves when you’re pumping gas and dispose of them in a garbage receptacle at the pump immediately after.
  • Use debit/credit cards instead of cash.
  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly.
  • Use hand sanitizer often.
  • If you develop symptoms, seek assistance where you are.  Don’t try to stick it out until you’re home.
  • Avoid crowds.
  • Wear a mask when you’re in public places.  N95 masks are the best if you have one but they’re needed by medical staff and are in short supply in many areas so the CDC is recommending that they are left for them.  A cloth mask will do, or a bandana or scarf folded in layers.  Continue to maintain your 6-ft. distancing even when wearing a mask.
  • Use your phone to communicate with customers to avoid as much face-to-face time as you can.
  • Disinfect your vehicle often.  Keep disinfectant wipes in your truck so you can use them to wipe down door handles, the steering wheel, gear shift, and pay particular attention to shared items like clipboards, pens, and dollies.
  • Be mindful of what you’re touching when you use a public bathroom.  Once you’ve washed your hands thoroughly, don’t touch anything else.  Use a paper towel to open the door.

More guidelines for protecting yourself during the coronavirus pandemic can be found on the CDC’s website.

By following guidelines and taking appropriate precautions, drivers can be safe and minimize their chances of getting the virus or passing it on and be more prepared in the future.

If you’re looking to start a career behind the wheel of a big rig, Trucker Search can help. Connecting truck drivers and employers is what we do.  It’s quick, it’s easy, and it can get you that dream job on the open road. Get started today at TruckerSearch.com or call us at (888)254-3712.  Stay safe!