Month: March 2019

The Dangers of Tailgating

the-dangers-of-tailgating

Truck drivers need to get freight from Point A to Point B as quickly as possible in order to keep costs down, pay up, and sometimes even to keep a job.  Unfortunately, this kind of pressure can contribute to bad driving practices―rushed driving that leads to tailgating.

As truckers know (and what non-truckers don’t always seem to understand), commercial trucks are extremely heavy, especially when carrying a full load, and require significant room to be able to come to a complete stop safely.  People usually don’t take this into consideration when they’re pulling into a lane in front of a large truck without leaving sufficient space.

A safety-conscious truck driver will keep a safe distance between his or her truck and the vehicle ahead but it’s not always possible to maintain a safe driving distance when traffic is heavy or the road ahead is not a big expanse of open road.  In cases like this, cautious truck drivers will stay in one lane and let the other drivers do the lane changing.

Driving while drowsy is a huge problem in the trucking industry.  To combat this, Hours of Service rules were put in place, designed to keep drivers from operating a truck while drowsy.  Unfortunately, Hours of Service may contribute to another problem: causing truckers to rush to complete a run before their hours are up.  

Truckers being tailgated is another problem.  Sometimes “drafters” will follow too closely behind big rigs to reduce the wind resistance on their vehicle.  This cuts their gas mileage considerably but is extremely dangerous. Trucks have a significant blind spot behind their trailers and they may not even be aware that someone is drafting until it’s too late and they are rear-ended in an accident.
Tailgaters will get into accidents, and there are no fender benders when it comes to big rigs and tailgating.  Being involved in an accident will slow a trucker down, definitely more time than what might have been gained by tailgating.  

Along with the accident and delayed delivery, the truck driver might receive an insurance increase, traffic fines, hospital bills, physical therapy bills, potential job loss, and lawsuit.  The ramifications of tailgating easily outweigh the few minutes you might save by driving recklessly and tailgating.

If the potential dangers with tailgating aren’t enough to make anyone think twice about doing it, consider this:  It’s also against the law.

The safe distance rule-of-thumb for all vehicles is to maintain one full vehicle’s length between vehicles for every 10 MPH traveled.  If a truck is traveling along at 50 MPH, it should be 5 full truck lengths between it and the vehicle in front of it. Of course, this doesn’t take into account the weight of the cargo or road conditions, weather, tire conditions, or visibility.

Or, according to the FMCSA (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration), if driving below 40 MPH, there should be one second between vehicles for every 10 feet of vehicle length which would be 4 seconds for tractor trailers.  For over 40 MPH, an additional second should be added. For adverse conditions, time should be doubled.

The bottom line is, if you’re a trucker who wants to avoid accidents and fines and wants to make deliveries on time, DON’T TAILGATE!

Trucker Search is an online tool that helps great drivers find great companies.  Drivers can search our extensive driving employment database or post their resumes and let trucking companies find them.  Go to TruckerSearch.com and find your new job today!

Source:

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safety/driver-safety/cmv-driving-tips-following-too-closely

Pros and Cons of Driving a Reefer

pros-and-cons-driving-a-reefer

Driving a refrigerated truck (reefer) is one of the most fundamental jobs there is:  bringing fresh food from the farm (distributors) to the people (stores). Reefers are the reason why people from Maine can have ripe avocados, people from Utah can have fresh lobster, and a small milk farmer can be distributed to a large chain of grocery stores.  Reefers keep food fresh and safe as it makes its way across town or across the country.

There are both pros and cons with most things in life, and driving a reefer is no different.  Many truck drivers who want to make themselves more versatile and marketable will get the training and expertise to drive different types of loads that require more knowledge.  Whether it’s hazardous materials or special equipment like a dump truck, having these added skills can put a driver above the rest of the pack.

Because refrigerated cargo is perishable and must be kept at a consistent, specific temperature, extra training is needed.  If temperature requirements are not strictly followed, the cargo is at risk of being spoiled and therefore a total loss, or worse, the cargo could become a public health hazard.

 

Pros of Driving a Reefer

  • Some dry loads are able to be hauled in the reefer which doubles possibilities for filling deadhead loads.
  • Typically, reefer drivers earn more money.
  • Fresh food is always in demand so there’s a consistent demand for reefer drivers, no matter how well the economy is doing.
  • Long haul drives are common which usually means more money.
  • Lumpers or people who unload trucks often will unload your cargo for you.  
  • If you do have to unload your cargo, a cool, refrigerated trailer is nicer than tractor trailers that are sweltering in the summer heat.
  • Most grocery stores and grocery chains have dedicated loading docks so they’re usually easy to maneuver into.

 

Cons

  • Reefers often need to be early-morning deliveries so there can be a lot of night driving.
  • The continuous noise from the refrigeration system can be difficult to tolerate for the driver as well as any trucks they park near.  The refrigeration units have to run constantly, including at night.
  • Reefers need to be cleaned out well after each haul.
  • Because there are two tanks and the refrigeration unit runs constantly, they use more fuel.
  • Long hauls are common so driving a reefer may not be the best option for drivers with families or who are looking for more regular hours.
  • Reefer drivers are responsible for controlling the cooling equipment.
  • Breakdowns could lead to freight spoilage.
  • Reefer repairs are more expensive than other vehicles.  

 

Driving a reefer isn’t for everyone.  Due to the importance of protecting the freight by strictly controlling the temperature and keeping the trailer interior  washed and clean, there is more work that goes along with higher pay. However, the added responsibility is the reason why many drivers choose to drive a reefer.  Add to that less competition for jobs and work stability even in the worst of economic times, driving a reefer can be a rewarding and lucrative challenge.

No matter what kind of truck you drive, Trucker Search can help you find trucking companies that are looking for you.  Go to TruckerSearch.com today and post your resume or search the extensive database of companies who need drivers like you.