Month: August 2019

Sun Damage is a Problem That Drivers Shouldn’t Ignore

sun-damage-tips-for-truck-drivers

When we think about professions that are at risk for sun damage and skin cancer, lifeguards and road crews come to mind.  As do constructions workers, farmers, roofers, and landscapers; but not truck drivers. They’re inside of a truck all day.

The truth is, sitting in  a truck cab for many hours every day exposes drivers to harmful sun.  Regular truck windows do little to protect a driver’s skin and as sunlight floods the cab, the driver is put at high risk for sun damage.  

In 2012, the New England Journal of Medicine released a photo of how sun damage can affect drivers as a prime example.  The photo showed dairy driver Bill McElligott, aged 66, whose face had aged significantly more on the left side than the right, after 28 years driving a truck with no protection from the sun.  The sun’s UV rays had caused the skin to thicken and lose its elasticity as well as put him at a higher risk to develop skin cancer.

The sun’s ultraviolet rays, both UVA and UVB, are damaging to unprotected skin.  The UVB rays are what cause the skin to burn or tan but UVA rays cause the skin to age because they penetrate the skin more deeply and can increase the risk of developing skin cancer.

Even when it’s cloudy, the sun’s UVA rays can get through, and when there’s snow on the ground, it reflects rays so it’s important drivers take steps to protect themselves from the damaging sun rays.

  • Wear sunscreen.  The sunscreen’s SPF (Sun Protection Factor) indicates how long you will be protected against UV rays but it’s not a shield.  For example, if your skin usually begins to burn after 15 minutes in the sun, an SPF 15 will protect your skin for 15 times that, or 225 minutes (33/4 hours), if the recommended amount is applied.  Even with the right amount, a small percentage of UV rays can still get through.  Be sure to get broad spectrum so you’re covered for both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Wear a hat.  Choose one with a brim that will keep the sun off your face.  
  • Wear long sleeves.  Even if you don’t drive with your left arm out the window, the sun can damage your skin.
  • Wear sunglasses.  Good ones will block out both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Shield yourself.  Buy UV-blocking window shields for your cab.
  • Check yourself.  Be on the lookout for premature wrinkles or spots that you haven’t noticed before or that have changed their shape.  If you find any, have them checked out by a doctor immediately. When you have your annual checkup, be sure to have your doctor look for any signs of damage or skin cancer.  

 

The vast majority of skin cancer can be prevented and is treatable―with early detection, the 5-year life expectancy for melanoma is 99%.  This doesn’t mean that it’s not dangerous.  According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer by the time they turn 70, and an estimated 7,230 people will die of melanoma in 2019.

Skin damage should be considered a serious health risk for all drivers.  By diligently protecting your skin when you’re on the job and when you’re off, you can avoid the associated health problems and keep your skin looking younger too!

 

Sources:

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1104059

https://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2012/06/03/sunny-side-old-pic-reveals-suns-aging-effects/

https://www.skincancer.org/risk-factors/uv-radiation/

https://www.skincancer.org/skin-cancer-information/skin-cancer-facts/

Eliminating Deadhead Miles

eliminating-deadhead-miles

Contrary to popular belief, deadhead miles are not when people follow the Grateful Dead around the country.  Deadhead miles, or deadhead trucking, is when a truck is empty on the road after delivering a load. When a truck is traveling without a load, someone is losing money and wasting fuel.

Deadhead miles can be a huge expense for both carriers and owner/operators.  It’s difficult to find accurate statistics on exactly how many deadhead miles trucks are driving because they are generally underreported, but any empty truck is a waste.

Deadheading is a Waste of Money

Every hour that a driver is on the clock driving an empty truck, it eats into profits especially for carriers who pay their employees by the hour.  Some companies that pay per mile will pay for deadhead miles but it’s usually a fraction of the full load pay.  

Deadheading is Bad for the Environment

Driving empty trucks eats up fuel and pumps carbon into the atmosphere for no reason.  It’s estimated that the amount of carbon that is emitted into the atmosphere from empty trucks is anywhere from 59,000,000-97,000,000 tons a year.  If half the number of trucks had a return load, that number could be as low as 29,500,000-48,500,000 tons.  

Deadheading is Dangerous

Trailers that are empty can be more dangerous because they’re more difficult to control and more prone to rollover accidents.  High winds can cause a trailer to sway without the added freight weight.

Reducing Deadhead Miles

Carriers and drivers can make their operations more efficient by tackling deadheading and the only way is to fill the trucks.

Fill trucks with return material.

When a company sends its products out on pallets, those pallets have to be shipped back to the company at some point.  Pallet pooling services handle the logistics of them, renting reusable pallets, and arranging trucks to reduce their deadhead miles.  Of course, the pay isn’t the same as carrying a full load but it can help offset some deadhead miles fuel costs and maybe even turn a profit.  Some carriers make money on deadhead miles by taking bales of recyclable cardboard to where they need to go.    

Find return loads for trucks. 

The best and rather obvious solution to deal with deadhead miles is to get loads for your return trip which is easier now than ever before.  Direct Freight Services is an intuitive load board that makes it easy to find loads all over the country. Once you have your original load lined up, search for loads by location on the Direct Freight database to find a load for your return trip.

With features like turn-by-turn route planning, load filtering, and text alerts, Direct Freight is one of the best load boards available.  Now with a free and easy-to-use app for your Android or iPhone, you’ll be able to reduce or even eliminate those deadhead miles altogether.  Go to Direct Freight Service’s website today to find out about all the features we have to offer.  

 

Sources:

https://medium.com/@mbarlin_42335/potential-carbon-savings-of-trucking-deadhead-miles-eb09e230123b

https://www.supplychaindigital.com/warehousing/pallet-pooling-makes-warehousing-sense